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Surrounding Area

Trough General Store & Canoe Rental

Located up river from Wapocoma Campground. The Trough is a 6 mile long stretch of the South Branch of the Potomac River, north of Moorefield, West Virginia. This forested canyon between river and sawmill ridges is home to bald eagles and abounds in native fish and wildlife. A canoe trip through the trough offers excitement to those who love nature!

Website: http://www.wvcanoerentals.com

Potomac Eagle Excursion Train

The historic Potomac Eagle Scenic Railroad is one of America's most beautiful train rides. For three hours enjoy a narrated excursion through a tranquil and pristine mountain valley. View historic farms and lush mountain greenery. Experience "The Trough," a spectacular narrow mountain valley. Below you runs the South Branch of the Potomac River, where the water is so clear that you can see fish as they lie resting in the shade. Above you the high mountain walls and thick forest help keep a secret few have discovered.

Website: http://www.potomaceagle.info/

Romney, West Virginia

Situated in the fertile valley of the South Branch of the Potomac River. In 1762, Romney was incorporated as the Hampshire County seat. During the Civil War Virginia was divided, and Hampshire County became part of the new state of West Virginia. The county had strong southern ties- Stonewall Jackson had an early campaign in Northern Hampshire County to cut a vital transportation link. Because of this strategic location there were many troop movements through the area.

Website: http://www.romneywv.com/

Seneca Rocks Discovery Center

A self-guided interpretive trail beginning behind the Seneca Rocks Discovery Center, the West Side Trail offers the non-climber a way to reach the lofty heights of the rocks and view the scenic valley below. The trail is 1.3 miles and ascends the north edge of the rocks to a viewing platform. Although steep the trail can be enjoyed by visitors of all ages. Steps, switchbacks and benches scattered along the trail all ease the trip for visitors. At the top you'll be rewarded by stepping onto the platform and viewing the lovely valley below.

Website: http://www.fs.fed.us/r9/mnf/sp/spruce_knob.html

Spruce Knob - Seneca Rocks

At 4,863 feet above sea level, Spruce Knob is West Virginia's highest peak. From this rugged alpine peak, you can view grassy openings and pastures or look down on forested ridges as far as the eye can see.

 

Website: http://www.fs.fed.us/r9/mnf/sp/spruce_knob.html

Dolly Sods

Located on the Cheat-Potomac Ranger District of the Monongahela National Forest in Tucker and Randolph Counties, West Virginia. Dolly Sods Wilderness has 25 miles of trails, many of which follow old railroad grades and logging roads. Many people like to hike loops through the area.

Website: http://www.fs.fed.us/r9/mnf/sp/dolly_sods_wilderness.htm

Smoke Hole Caverns

A tour of the caverns offers an insiders view of a moonshine still as clever enterprising bootleggers used to take full advantage of the geography of the area and many stills were hidden among the caverns. Other highlights of the tour include the world's longest ribbon stalactite and an artesian well from which you can drink if you wish. Seneca Caverns, West Virginia's largest cavern, is also a few miles away if you would like to further explore West Virginia's underground wonders.

Website: http://www.smokehole.com/caverns.html

Luray Caverns

Just west of Luray, Virginia, USA, which has drawn many visitors since its discovery in 1878. The underground cavern system is generously adorned with speleothems (columns, mud flows, stalactites, stalagmites, flowstone, mirrored pools, etc). The caverns are noted for the Great Stalacpipe Organ, a lithophone made from solenoid fired strikers that tap stalactites of various sizes to produce tones similar to those of xylophones, tuning forks, or bells.

Website: http://www.luraycaverns.com/

Canaan Valley

It’s a high-mountain paradise with more miles of trail than road, more designated wilderness areas than traffic lights, more room to roam, and more adventure than you can shake a hiking stick at. From the rugged beauty of the Blackwater Canyon to the pristine back country of the Dolly Sods wilderness, it’s a world untouched, unhurried, and unrivaled.

Website: http://www.fws.gov/canaanvalley/

Blackwater Falls

Named for the falls of the Blackwater River whose amber-colored waters plunge five stories then twist and tumble through an eight-mile long gorge. The "black" water is a result of tannic acid from fallen hemlock and red spruce needles. The falls are one of the most photographed sites in West Virginia.

Website: http://www.blackwaterfalls.com/

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